Stayin’ Cool While it’s Meltin’ Out

It’s August and it’s hot out! Hopefully you and your pups have been enjoying all summer has to offer! But what do you do when it’s just too hot for your pup to safely enjoy outdoor activities? Here are some things Link & the Adventure Pups like to do to avoid melting!

  1. Early Morning & Evening Walks & Outings
    • Depending on your pup’s age, weight, health, & breed temperatures as low as 70 degrees can be too hot to exercise in
    • For most pups, 85 degrees is too hot and can lead to heatstroke when exercising (especially when overweight, elderly, or brachycephalic breed)
    • Feel the ground with the back of your palm to make sure it’s not too hot for your pup’s paws
    • Don’t forget how hot the inside of your car can get- if it’s only 70 out and you leave your pup in the car for half an hour, the inside of your car could be 105 degrees (even with all the windows down)
  2. Water, Water Everywhere
    • Take your pup to dog friendly bodies of water so they have easy access to cool down- make sure the water is from a clean source before allowing them to take a dip
    • Human swimming pools contain chlorine, so be sure to rinse your pup after swimming in one (double the water! woohoo!)
    • Kiddie Pools are great things to have in the yard for your pup
    • Bring a portable water bowl and plenty of fresh water for you AND your pup- don’t rely on nature’s water, it can contain hazardous bacteria & parasites that could kill
    • You can both have fun running in the sprinklers while watering the lawn- some pups enjoy the mister hose attachments too
    • Wet bandanas around both yours and your pup’s necks keep you cool
  3. Pupsicles & Cool Treats
    • Mix up some plain yogurt & your pup’s favorite berries/fruits/veggies/treats, pour the mixture into an ice cube tray & pop em in the freezer
    • Put peanut butter or squirt cheese in a Kong (feel free to mix in kibble or treats) and put in the freezer
    • Watermelon! That’s it… it’s delicious & refreshing
  4. Fun in the Sun
    • Paddle boarding & Kayaking are great ways to bond with your pup- always make sure your pup wears a life jacket
    • Floaty toys are a great way to get your pup into the water, just be sure to throw them where you are able to fetch them yourself, just in case
    • Doing a river float is a relaxing way to hang out with your pup- have them wear a life jacket and give them breaks from swimming (even the most talented swimmers can drown!)

The main thing to remember is: your dog is more heat sensitive than you. Always make sure they have fresh drinking water, access to shade, and that they don’t overexert themselves!

Feeling Cheated?

Summer in Oregon is amazing, right? The sun is shining, the rivers are glistening, and the cheatgrass is blooming.

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Oh cheatgrass… the bane of my summer existence. But it doesn’t have to be so bad. Below are some tips to help avoid getting cheated, but first let me explain what cheatgrass actually is, for those new to Central Oregon.

Cheatgrass’ entire purpose, much like any living thing on the planet, is to reproduce. It can become a nuisance to pups once the plant dries out and drops its tiny barbed seed pods, which can get into paws, eyes, nostrils, and burrow its way into fur or skin. Cheatgrass usually reaches its prime in summer and early fall and it is quite invasive. They contain teeny tiny barbs that enable the seed to work its way deep into skin and fur, and even into mucus membranes. The barbs are one-way, similar to porcupine quills, causing them to be near impossible to get out.

  • familiarize yourself with cheatgrass and know what it looks like, in all stages of its life. take note of what trails you see it on and where you don’t.
  • check your pet after every outing. you should check your pup’s entire body over, paying extra close attention to ears, eyes, nose, mouth, under the collar or harness, between toes, and paw pads. yea, everywhere.
  • haircuts and grooming. keep those coats trimmed and brushed to limit the amount of fluff for cheat to grasp onto. keep the hair between the toes nice and short, as this is the most common place for cheat to hide in.
  • have a second set of eyes check your pup.
  • make sure your pup isn’t munchin’ on cheat. most dogs enjoy a nibble of grass here and there, but double check to they aren’t ingesting cheat as it can get into the lungs and abdomen and cause serious infections.
  • keep your dog on leash in areas with a lot of cheat, just to keep them from venturing into it.

If your pup has been attacked by cheatgrass, look for signs of infection such as fatigue, loss of appetite, and swelling. If you notice your pup sneezing, shaking its head, scratching its ears a lot, excessively licking, specifically on paws and in between toes, you may want to swing by the vet clinic. Look for any redness, swelling, or drainage. You can remove cheatgrass yourself if it hasn’t gone too deep, but some cases require the barbs to be surgically removed.

Certain dog breeds are more susceptible to cheat than others. Long hair can hide cheat very easily, make sure your pup is free of dreadlocks to avoid cheat burrowing into them. Curly hair seems to just suck up cheat, doodles are an excellent target. Wire hair is thick and hides cheat well.

 

Summer is Coming

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For many of us the summer sun is already upon us! Here are some easy tips on keeping your Pup safe from the heat this summer:

In the Car

The temperature inside your vehicle can rise almost 20º F in just 10 minutes. In 60 minutes, the temperature in your vehicle can be more than 40 degrees higher than the outside temperature. On a 70-degree day, that’s 110 degrees inside your vehicle. Try sitting in your car and see how quickly it becomes uncomfortable.

  • If at all possible, avoid leaving your pup in the car. No matter how fast you will be, the car gets hot real quick and dogs can die of heat stroke in a hot car.
  • Leaving the windows cracked doesn’t actually help too much. A car with cracked windows can heat up just as quickly as a completely sealed car. Leaving the windows all the way down helps with air flow, but make sure your dog cannot jump out, and bring your valuables with you. The car still heats up with all the windows down.
  • Leave the air conditioner running. It’s always best if you have another human in the car that can wait with the Pups.
  • Park in the shade.
  • Leave them water!

On a Walk

  • Put a human paw to the ground to check its temperature. If it’s uncomfortable for you, chances are it’s uncomfortable for your Pup.
  • Walk on the grass rather than sun-cooked dirt or pavement.
  • Those winter boots can be used in the summer too.
  • Go on outings earlier in the morning and later in the evening to avoid the hottest parts of the day.
  • If going on a longer walk than a jaunt around the block bring some water for your pup. I carry a Gulpy because it’s easy and I can also drink from it.
  • Walking near a water source is a good idea. Either a clean stream or water fountains. A place where your Pup can take a dip or at least wet their paws is ideal.
  • A wet bandana helps keep your Pup cool. Dumping water onto their necks is also quite refreshing.

In the House

  • Always make sure there’s fresh water available. Adding a second water bowl to the house (or third) is helpful.
  • Ice cubes are great to add to water bowls.
  • Frozen treats are a great… treat. Peanut Butter in a Kong in the freezer is simple. Mixing plain yogurt with dog friendly fruits, berries, and veggies into an ice tray is a step up.
  • Air conditioner or fans and open windows are necessary for a dog an inside dog. A cool surface to lie on is appreciated.
  • If your Pup has to be outdoors make sure they have a covered shelter and access to plenty of cool water. Water left in a metal bowl in the sun gets very hot.
  • A kiddie pool is a fun addition, and you can benefit from it too.

Pampering

  • Coconut oil and Musher’s Secret are great relief for cracked or burned paws.
  • A well groomed coat helps to release heat. Matted and knotted hair keeps the heat in.
  • Shaving the coat is very helpful, but some breeds should NOT be shaved so do a little research before taking out the shears.