Leg Warmers Are Still Hip

Winter is upon us! We hope everyone else is having as much fun as we are in the snow! We also hope everyone is enjoying their fashionable winter wear! Winter coats are a must for humans, but they are also very helpful with Pups. If your Pup is lacking fluff or has a wild coat that collect snowballs, a doggie jacket could become a very helpful tool for you and your Pup this winter. It will keep them warmer and dryer, and will also prevent snowballs from collecting in their fur coats.

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But what about their bare feet?! Depending on the dog’s coat, snow can collect between toes and paw pads making walking more difficult and uncomfortable. So now you’ll have to get some doggie booties. After several minutes of struggling to get the boots on correctly, your Pup can now plow through snow without snow clumping up between their toes! Dog boots are difficult for some dogs to get used to, so it’s always helpful to get your Pup accustom to them before a big adventure.

But wait… all four of their legs are still exposed! “Oh geez don’t tell me I have to get more clothing for my dog!” Yes! Get some leg warmers! I know, I know, this sounds utterly ridiculous. But sometimes when you’re out on longer treks in the snow, snowballs can twist their way further into a dog’s fur and create painful dreadlocks. You see this a lot with Poodles and Doodles, which is why dog gaiters have been invented! Gaiters are more useful than a coat, and some of them even come with boots attached! So you don’t have to spend half an hour putting booties on your dog only to discover five minutes into your hike two of the booties have gone missing.

You can also make your own doggie leg warmers out of socks! They aren’t as durable, or as fashionable, but they keep your Pup’s legs protected against the elements, and they’re cheap! Simply get some socks and cut the seam on the toe. If they don’t stay up you can get some velcro straps from a hardware or craft store to add at the top.

Not every dog needs gaiters, or booties, or even jackets. Some dogs (like my RottenChow) are made for winter and snow just falls out of their fur. But if your Pup is having to put play on hold to chew snowballs out of their feet you might want to explore your options for a more enjoyable winter outing.

 

*The links that I have provided are just some recommendations of products that I have first hand experience with, or have been told by a trusted dog pal that they are reliable, quality products. I have yet to find dog boots that I really want to rave about, but the two links are to boots that frustrate me the least. We love recommendations so if you have any always feel free to share!

 

 

Fur Coat Being Bogged Down by Snowballs?

Winter finally arrived in Central Oregon and there are a lot of Pups that are new to the snow and are unsure of how to react to it!

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Yes, snow is fun. Most of us turn into little puppies when winter hits. But what happens when our fluffy side kick pops out of the frozen ground and is covered in tiny snowballs? You can pick them out with your fingers, but after a couple minutes of this activity your fingers go numb and your efforts are fruitless. If you ignore them until later they can twist further into the fur and cause painful dreadlocks.

How can you eliminate these snowballs? And more importantly how can you prevent them from ever appearing in your dog’s fluff? Here on a few tips I know of…

Snowballs can be avoided by:

  • Trimming your Pup’s fluff– trimming down their toe hair so they are more tame or even bare knuckled is an easy way to avoid snow clumps. This of course causes your Pup’s toes to be more exposed to the cold, so be careful on certain breeds and on those that rarely spend time in the cold. Some dog coats are not meant to be shaved so make sure you speak to a professional first!
  • Boots are another great way to keep paws safe from frost. I have yet to meet a dog that enjoys wearing shoes, but if you can get your Pup to use them it’s an awesome way to keep their paws and paw pads protected! I have found the best way to get my Pup excited about stuff is to wrap it like a gift! I wrapped up his boots and got very excited about them, using my best Minnie Mouse voice. I let him open them and sniff them and then gave him treats while I put on his new boots. He walked around like a baby deer stuck in tar, but then I took him outside and we played a game of soccer and he was forced to adjust to them! It’s still difficult to convince him to wear them on hikes, but treats and reassurance help him to forget about them! Ruffwear makes a lot of different kinds, so you can find the best fit for your Pup!
  • The best kept secret to avoid snow balls is… Musher’s Secret! It’s a protective wax you apply to your Pup’s pads and fur and it helps prevent snow and ice from attaching to them! You can find it at your local pet store, or on the World Wide Web!

You can remove snowballs by:

  • Brushing them out! I find slicker brushes are the best to use on snowballs. Make sure to get to the skin, as some snowballs can twist themselves up into the fur.
  • Rinsing in warm water! Make sure the water isn’t too warm, but warm enough to melt the snow. You should still brush the fur after rinsing, just in case some stubborn snow is hiding.

If you have any tips on how to remove snow and protect those precious potatoes, or know of any good dog boots let me know!

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