Winter Preparedness

Our favorite time of the year is coming! Time to roll in the snow, play catch with snowballs, and plow through powder! Below you will find some tips on how to keep your Pup safe & some suggestions on how to have fun in the cold!

Safety First

Be sure to play in areas that you are familiar with! The snow can hide secret dangers such as sticks, rocks, pipes, etc. Make sure your pup isn’t leaping and bounding in areas that could contain these sharp items, and instead play in areas that you know well.

Keep snowballs from accumulating in your Pup’s fluff! Boots, jackets, gaiters are all great options for keeping your Pup’s fur free of snow and ice clumps. Be sure to get them comfortable wearing these items before big outings. Fresh haircuts are also helpful in keeping snowballs at bay. Keeping leg & foot fluff closely trimmed will do wonders. Snow & ice clumps can cause painful knots and dreadlocks. If you get snow clumps, coconut oil & Musher’s Secret are very helpful.

Don’t eat any snow! Snow can carry bacteria and parasites, and most snow salts are unsafe for digestion, so though it may look like a lot of fun, try not to let your Pup eat snow.

Swimming season is over! When outdoor temps drop below 45, it’s a good rule of thumb to avoid swimming. Especially if you’re far from a warm, dry place. Dogs can get hypothermia too.

Snow clumps can be a nuisance for fluffy Pups

Fun & Games

Nosework is an awesome game to play in the snow! The snow makes it more difficult to pick up scents, so placing items/toys/treats in the snow can be quite the brain game. Pieces of cheese work great!

Snow mazes are fun for everyone! Dig out a snow maze in your yard or a nearby park and have your Pup run through. You can combine mazes with nosework for even more fun.

Sink a ball in the snow! Toss a ball into the snow so it sinks a bit and have your Pup jump in after it. Make sure you do this in an area that you know doesn’t contain hidden dangers.

Skijoring is a great bonding & physical exercise! It literally connects you and your dog and gets you both outside, working out your bodies and your minds.

Bonding & Exercise! (photo from akc.org)

Sometimes Home is Best

There are a lot of outdoor winter activities your dog is not interested in. Use your best judgement when deciding on bringing your Pup along. You know them best, after all.

Sitting outdoors at local watering holes or restaurants. Even with a coat on, your Pup can get very wet & cold sitting outdoors watching you and your human friends sip on beer. And it’s not always as fun for them as it is for you.

Shreddin’ Mt Bachelor is for humans. Bringing your Pup along to wait in the car is not fun or comfortable. A warm couch is a better option for them. If you can’t leave them alone in your hotel, look into some dog care options 🙂

Places to Get Outdoor Gear

Ruffwear is local AND they make excellent products!

Hundr is a company in the UK that takes old human outdoor clothing and recycles it into new, fashionable dog gear!

Backcountry has a lot of different brands under one roof… roof, roof! Woah sorry I got carried away.

Dogs & Wildfires

The entire West Coast is burning. Thousands of people have lost their homes and have had to evacuate. Areas not on fire are consumed by thick smoke. Oregon is under a state of emergency. Air quality in Central Oregon is horrendous and people have been advised to stay indoors. But what do the fires and smoke mean for your Adventure loving Pup?! And what about all your other pets and livestock that have to stay outdoors?!

photo credit: Noah Berger, Associated Press

As unhealthy as smoke can be to humans, it can also cause serious health problems for nonhuman animals. Smoke from wildfires affects pets, horses, livestock and wildlife. If you can see or feel the effects of smoke yourself, you should take precautions to keep your pets and livestock safe.

Look for the following signs of possible smoke irritation. If any of your animals are experiencing any of these signs, please consult your veterinarian:

  • Coughing/gagging
  • Difficulty breathing; panting, wheezing, gasping
  • Eye irritation
  • Excessively drinking water
  • Reduced appetite and/or thirst
  • Inflammation of throat or mouth
  • Nasal discharge
  • Fatigue/weakness/lethargy
  • Disorientation or stumbling

Tips to protect pets & livestock

  • Keep pets indoors as much as possible, and keep your windows shut.
  • Birds are particularly susceptible and should not be allowed outside when smoke is present
  • Brief outdoor bathroom breaks
  • Avoid outdoor exercise during periods of poor air quality.
  • Have a pet evacuation kit ready, include your animals in your disaster preparedness planning. (see below for kit info)
  • Limit exercise when smoke is visible. Don’t require animals to perform activities that cause labored breathing.
  • Provide plenty of fresh water near feeding areas.
  • Limit dust exposure by feeding low-dust or dust-free feeds and misting the livestock area.
  • Have a livestock evacuation plan ready in advance. Coordinate with neighbors/friends if you don’t have enough trailers.
  • Remove dead trees, clear away brush, and maintain a defensible space around livestock structures.
  • Give livestock 4-6 weeks to recuperate after the air quality returns to normal. Attempting to handle, move, or transport livestock may delay healing.

The fires have been spreading quickly and many people are awaiting evacuation orders. If you have not prepared for emergency evacuation, and are looking for some guidance on how to do so, The American Veterinary Medical Association has everything laid out in a downloadable booklet entitled “Saving the Whole Family”.

If you and your Pup don’t have the option to stay indoors, there are air filtering masks for dogs that can help them breathe and stay healthy.

2020 has been challenging… but we can make it through! Be prepared, be thoughtful, and be safe!