Summer is Coming

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For many of us the summer sun is already upon us! Here are some easy tips on keeping your Pup safe from the heat this summer:

In the Car

The temperature inside your vehicle can rise almost 20º F in just 10 minutes. In 60 minutes, the temperature in your vehicle can be more than 40 degrees higher than the outside temperature. On a 70-degree day, that’s 110 degrees inside your vehicle. Try sitting in your car and see how quickly it becomes uncomfortable.

  • If at all possible, avoid leaving your pup in the car. No matter how fast you will be, the car gets hot real quick and dogs can die of heat stroke in a hot car.
  • Leaving the windows cracked doesn’t actually help too much. A car with cracked windows can heat up just as quickly as a completely sealed car. Leaving the windows all the way down helps with air flow, but make sure your dog cannot jump out, and bring your valuables with you. The car still heats up with all the windows down.
  • Leave the air conditioner running. It’s always best if you have another human in the car that can wait with the Pups.
  • Park in the shade.
  • Leave them water!

On a Walk

  • Put a human paw to the ground to check its temperature. If it’s uncomfortable for you, chances are it’s uncomfortable for your Pup.
  • Walk on the grass rather than sun-cooked dirt or pavement.
  • Those winter boots can be used in the summer too.
  • Go on outings earlier in the morning and later in the evening to avoid the hottest parts of the day.
  • If going on a longer walk than a jaunt around the block bring some water for your pup. I carry a Gulpy because it’s easy and I can also drink from it.
  • Walking near a water source is a good idea. Either a clean stream or water fountains. A place where your Pup can take a dip or at least wet their paws is ideal.
  • A wet bandana helps keep your Pup cool. Dumping water onto their necks is also quite refreshing.

In the House

  • Always make sure there’s fresh water available. Adding a second water bowl to the house (or third) is helpful.
  • Ice cubes are great to add to water bowls.
  • Frozen treats are a great… treat. Peanut Butter in a Kong in the freezer is simple. Mixing plain yogurt with dog friendly fruits, berries, and veggies into an ice tray is a step up.
  • Air conditioner or fans and open windows are necessary for a dog an inside dog. A cool surface to lie on is appreciated.
  • If your Pup has to be outdoors make sure they have a covered shelter and access to plenty of cool water. Water left in a metal bowl in the sun gets very hot.
  • A kiddie pool is a fun addition, and you can benefit from it too.

Pampering

  • Coconut oil and Musher’s Secret are great relief for cracked or burned paws.
  • A well groomed coat helps to release heat. Matted and knotted hair keeps the heat in.
  • Shaving the coat is very helpful, but some breeds should NOT be shaved so do a little research before taking out the shears.

Fur Coat Being Bogged Down by Snowballs?

Winter finally arrived in Central Oregon and there are a lot of Pups that are new to the snow and are unsure of how to react to it!

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Yes, snow is fun. Most of us turn into little puppies when winter hits. But what happens when our fluffy side kick pops out of the frozen ground and is covered in tiny snowballs? You can pick them out with your fingers, but after a couple minutes of this activity your fingers go numb and your efforts are fruitless. If you ignore them until later they can twist further into the fur and cause painful dreadlocks.

How can you eliminate these snowballs? And more importantly how can you prevent them from ever appearing in your dog’s fluff? Here on a few tips I know of…

Snowballs can be avoided by:

  • Trimming your Pup’s fluff– trimming down their toe hair so they are more tame or even bare knuckled is an easy way to avoid snow clumps. This of course causes your Pup’s toes to be more exposed to the cold, so be careful on certain breeds and on those that rarely spend time in the cold. Some dog coats are not meant to be shaved so make sure you speak to a professional first!
  • Boots are another great way to keep paws safe from frost. I have yet to meet a dog that enjoys wearing shoes, but if you can get your Pup to use them it’s an awesome way to keep their paws and paw pads protected! I have found the best way to get my Pup excited about stuff is to wrap it like a gift! I wrapped up his boots and got very excited about them, using my best Minnie Mouse voice. I let him open them and sniff them and then gave him treats while I put on his new boots. He walked around like a baby deer stuck in tar, but then I took him outside and we played a game of soccer and he was forced to adjust to them! It’s still difficult to convince him to wear them on hikes, but treats and reassurance help him to forget about them! Ruffwear makes a lot of different kinds, so you can find the best fit for your Pup!
  • The best kept secret to avoid snow balls is… Musher’s Secret! It’s a protective wax you apply to your Pup’s pads and fur and it helps prevent snow and ice from attaching to them! You can find it at your local pet store, or on the World Wide Web!

You can remove snowballs by:

  • Brushing them out! I find slicker brushes are the best to use on snowballs. Make sure to get to the skin, as some snowballs can twist themselves up into the fur.
  • Rinsing in warm water! Make sure the water isn’t too warm, but warm enough to melt the snow. You should still brush the fur after rinsing, just in case some stubborn snow is hiding.

If you have any tips on how to remove snow and protect those precious potatoes, or know of any good dog boots let me know!

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New Year, (re)New(ed) Appreciation

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Link & I would like to start 2019 off with a big THANK YOU to all those humans out there that help animals. From big, heroic feats to small acts of human decency, THANK YOU!

If you have rescued a hamster from a burning building, stopped your car for a squirrel that likes to dance in the road, adopted an animal in need, donated to your local shelter, or done anything to positively influence the life of an animal, THANK YOU!

YOU make the world a more tolerable place. YOU give others hope that we aren’t all selfish monsters. YOU help us let out a sigh of relief.

Thanks.

Here are some positive animal stories to start your 2019 off on a good note.

You know those little hermit crabs you see with tiny intricate scenes painted on their shells? You usually find them in mall pet stores, perhaps even a friend had one in growing up. Well, a lot of those end up forgotten or released onto the beaches of the East Coast (they are native to the Caribbean). People who get them often do not know what care they require, forget about them quickly, and they are left in the corner of the room like an unloved houseplant. But one wonderful woman named Sarah Porter drove across 3 states rescuing about 30 of  these under-appreciated animals. Read the entire article, and watch a cute video, at USA Today

 

A lot of people are nice enough to volunteer at shelters during the busy holiday season, and this magician (John Stessel) decided he wanted to help dogs get adopted by showing them magic tricks and then making adorable videos of their reactions! It always benefits shelters animals to get them to break out of their shell and forget about the stress of shelter life, that way potential adopters can get a glimpse of their true personality. Using treats in an illusion is always a good way to get an silly, yet honest reaction from a dog 🙂

 

This is utterly amazing. Sea Life Trust has done something pretty cool to help with those sea animals that have worked a life in showbiz and cannot return to the wild, specifically Beluga Whales, Sea Life Trust has made the very first Open Sea Whale Sanctuary and in Spring of this year it will be the new home to Little White and Little Grey, two Belugas that had been working at a Chinese waterpark for more than 7 years, and have recently retired. The whales are 12 years old and spend their days floating around a small concrete tank. Soon they will be taking a 6,000mi trip from Shanghai to their new 344,000 sq ft bay home in Iceland.

 

This story might be the hardest to watch, but it has a good payoff too. Classic story of sweet, kind woman walking through a neighborhood to meet abandoned, malnourished dog knocking on Death’s door and forever changing his life. 

 

 

 

The Adventure Pup Experience

Lately people have been asking me what I do for work, and when I say “I run a hiking service for dogs” I get the same reaction, “Oh fun! What a great thing!” And yes, they’re correct to say that, it is amazing and I love doing it, but after some more conversation I come to realize a lot of people see me as either a boarding facility, jam packed with dogs (they’re only half listening to what I’m saying), or that 9 year old neighbor you have that always wants to be around your dog and will always jump at the opportunity to watch them when you leave town (yes I was that 9 year old some time ago), but my job is so much more than that, so I thought I would explain what makes Adventure Pup a different experience.

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  • I truly love your dog (or cat, or iguana, or fish, or rat) as much as I did when I was a kid hopping your fence to lay in your yard with them. I know your pup’s hobbies and pet peeves, I can pick them out of a line-up of dogs that other people would assume are clones, and I will remember them until I am old and senile. They will get excited when they run into me in public, and you might not even recognize me. I will have photos of them forever on my computer, and sometimes (currently) pinned to my wall above my desk, to brighten my day when I need it. I will constantly talk about them to my human friends.
  • On that note, I have more dog friends than human friends. I just prefer the company of non-human animals. It makes me a little awkward to talk to, but also great with your pups.
  • I see dogs as individuals. I don’t do the same activity for every dog. I know who likes doing what and I know what activities to avoid with certain dogs. Everyone is different and unique, and I set up my day to day with that in mind.
  • Packs are kept small and intimate, not only so I am able to physically control everyone on leash at once, but also so that all dogs enjoy the outing. Small packs help keep the excitement level down, which results in less anxiety and a more connected pack. Pups are also matched based on energy level and individual personalities so every member of the pack enjoys their Adventure.
  • Every outing involves both physical and mental stimulation. Pups are given gentle guidance and work on basic commands while out on Adventures, nose work is done with dogs that do better with a job, and tTouch is done with all Adventure Pups to help create a stronger bond, alleviate stiff joints, or release some anxious energy. After a dog has been with me for a length of time I have to use very little voice control and most pups will follow my energy. May sound a bit flower-power to some, but it works for me.
  • Different techniques are used for different dogs to help them grow and learn at their own pace. I use a variety of training techniques and exercises (basically anything except old school/negative reinforcement training) and I am always continuing my education by attending different animal classes and holding side jobs in various animal industries (retail, nutrition, medical, daycare, training, shelters, etc.)
  • I follow dog rules: off-leash in certain areas and not in others, picking up poop and taking them with me, only allowing dog/people friendly dogs off leash, bringing no more than 3 dogs to a dog park. I’m a pretty big square and love a good set of rules.
  • I am prepared for each outing with a car stocked with dog necessities & emergency kits and also carry a pouch with me on every hike carrying smaller versions of necessities & emergency kits (I made a post about that a little while back if you’re curious). I also prepare myself by knowing where I am going ahead of time and familiarizing myself with the trail before bringing Adventure Pups along (my dog Link is a huge help in these tests).

If you have a dog walker or pet sitter they should posses these qualities. I form very deep bonds with animals, even if I know them briefly, but I have worked with some people who do not actually care for the animal they’re watching & out of all the “animal people” I know there are only a select few I would trust with my own dog.