Wildlife Education: Creepy Crawlers

When you’re out on the trail with your Pup there are a plethora of animals out there. Some are harmless, some are scared, and some are more than willing to stand their ground and defend their territory. Having some knowledge about the various animals out there will help you be prepared for when you and your Pup meet one on the trail. Let’s explore some Central Oregon wild animals together, starting with the smallest.

Fleas– Have you heard of the Central Oregon flea rumor? Someone is going around telling everyone that fleas don’t exist in Central Oregon! It’s blasphemy! Though fleas are uncommon in Central Oregon, they definitely exist. The High Desert is too cold and dry for fleas to thrive, but they live happily in rodent burrows and deer beds. They are normally only around during the warmer months, from spring through summer. Flea bites can cause a lot of grief, irritation, and pain. Keep your pups up to date on flea meds to keep them (and your entire world) protected. If you find fleas on your pup you’ll have to immediately give them a medicated flea bath and clean everything in your home.

Stock photo of fleas in dog fur

Thatching AntsThatching ants are somethin’ fierce. They have black thoraxes, red heads, and very angry faces. They got their name by creating their home in giant mounds made of mostly pine needles, sticks, and debris. You can see the mounds moving with ants. Each nest could contain literally millions of these ants. The threat of these ants is their bite! Human or dog, these ants will latch on and bite you! And those bites are lasting. They burn and sting and itch for hours after. It’s easy to avoid their mounds, but they have exit holes everywhere so ants swarm in a wide radius of their nests. Wearing high socks will help you, but your Pups are more exposed. If you notice them fussing with their feet or legs give them a once over and remove any ants you see. Tweezers work best, but you can also wrap up your hand in a cloth or poop bag and pluck those suckers out!

Stock photo of thatching ants

Ticks– There are about 20 different species of ticks in Oregon. Four of them are more common than others: the western Black-legged tick (also known as the deer tick), the Rocky Mountain wood tick, the American Dog tick, and the Brown Dog tick. The western black-legged tick is the only species known to carry Lyme disease in Oregon, but there are other diseases that can be transmitted by ticks. Ticks often bite and burrow without the host even knowing. Many people who end up with a tick related disease had no idea they’d even been bit. Some ticks are smaller than a poppy seed, and they hang around in your hair or other areas you wouldn’t think to check after a trip outside. They’re sneaky, and very good at what they do. Ticks love hanging out on the tips of tall grass, waiting for an unsuspecting victim to brush through the grass. They latch onto their host and don’t let go. They have tiny hooks in their mouths that they use to burrow into skin. If you find one on your pup you can remove them with tweezers. Place the tip of the tweezers as close to the skin as possible, do your best to pinch the tick by the head and pull it straight out, slowly. If you are not comfortable or confident removing a tick take them into the vet asap. Check your dogs after every outing, and keep them up to date on tick medication to keep them safe and healthy.

Stock photo of a tick burrowing into skin

Spiders– Spiders are everywhere, and pups are constantly getting into their business. The three types of spiders to look out for are Black Widows, Hobos, and Yellow Sac spiders. The most common, and most dangerous venomous spider is a Black Widow. Females are the ones to look out for, as most males are rarely seen and are often eaten by their mates. They are black and sport a red hourglass on the bottom side of their abdomen. Their bite can cause muscle pain, nausea, and paralysis of the diaphragm, making breathing difficult. Hobo spiders are also something to look out for. They are reddish brown and often have stripes across the tops of their bodies. Their bites can cause necrosis, headaches, and vision impairment. And lastly, Yellow Sac spiders have a bite similar to the Brown Recluse. They are not quite yellow, and are more of a brownish tan color. Their bites are not as serious as the Black Widow or Hobo, but can cause swelling, redness, and a stinging sensation. These three spiders can be found anywhere. In homes, in yards, in the desert, and in the woods. They don’t bite humans very often, but will bite a dog if they are startled or feel threatened. Pups will often show signs of a bite within an hour. Most bites occur on their faces and will begin to swell. You most likely will not know that your pup encountered a spider, but if you see swelling or redness occur take them to the vet right away.

Stock photo of a pup with a swollen face

Stay tuned for our next Wilderness Education post about Small Animals such as squirrels, porcupines, badgers, etc.

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